Population Centre and Rural Area Classification 2016



The introduction is about something

Status

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification is the current The standard of the department On January 16, 2017, it was approved

What is new?

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification is a new standard

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification is used

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification 2016 is used to identify Canada’s population centres. The standard names and codes for POPCTRs and RA are provided by a classification variant

There is a background

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification is used to classify population centers and rural areas

The term ‘urban’ is used to describe a high density of people. It is the opposite of rural, where population is dispersed at a low density. This perspective easily identifies the extremes of a continuum. How to segment the continuum is not intuitive

The 1971 Census and the 2006 Census were used to define urban areas. An urban area was defined as having a population of at least 1,000 and a density of 400 or more people per square kilometre. Rural area was defined as territory outside of an urban area. The entire nation was covered by urban areas and rural areas

The methodology established a dichotomy for Canada. The approach was not without challenges. The term ‘urban’ is used a lot and the interpretation of what is urban varies from point to point

The 1971 Census showed that all communities that met the minimum population concentration and density requirements were labeled as urban areas. They included small centres with a population of 1,000 to one million. The approach ignored the differences among the urban areas. The term ‘urban area’ could have led to misinterpretations, given the widely accepted view that a more dynamic urban-rural continuum existed

Statistics Canada had not been using the term ‘urban’ consistently when it was distributing its data. The term ‘urban’ was sometimes used when referring to a census metropolitan area. The areas are usually comprised of both urban and rural areas

Two changes were made to address these challenges. The term ‘population centre’ was replaced by the term ‘urban area’. A population centre is an area with a population of at least 1,000 and a density of 400 or more people per square kilometre. Rural areas were defined as areas outside of population centers

Population centres were divided into three groups based on the size of their population to reflect the existence of an urban-rural continuum

  • There are between 1,000 and 29,999 small population centres
  • Medium population centers have a population of between 30,000 and 99,999
  • Large urban population centers have a population of 100,000 or more

The intent of this set was to provide users with a basic starting point to better understand the dynamic landscape of Canada

Users of the former urban area concept can still use population centres to continue their analysis

The changes were meant to improve the interpretation of Statistics Canada data and help users study the Canadian urban-rural landscape

The use of a secondary population density threshold and employment density were added to the rules for population centers in the year 2016

A framework and definitions

The basic principles of statistical classification are followed by the Population Centre and Rural Area Classification. It consists of a set of units that are mutually exclusive and cover the entire universe. A classification is usually a hierarchy, each level of which is defined by the same criterion. The boundaries of geographic areas are defined by well-defined concepts and the entire landmass of Canada is included in a classification

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification is one of the geographical classifications used in Statistics Canada. When adopted for data collection and dissemination, the geographical classifications give the basic definitions of geographic areas which result in statistics that are comparable among data series and over time

There are 918 small population centres in the Population Centre and Rural Area Classification

Population centers

The population density of a population centre is based on the current Census of Population counts. Rural areas are areas outside of population centers

Population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada

Population centres are classified into three groups based on the size of their population

  • There are small population centres with a population between 1000 and 29,999
  • Medium population centers have a population between 30,000 and 99,999
  • Large urban population centres have a large population

The population of the population centre includes all of the population living in the core, secondary and fringes of the census metropolitan areas and the population living outside of the CAs

The population centre derivation used a revised set of criteria. Blocks from the 2016 Census were used for the delineation. The delineation steps had new thresholds added to them

The primary density threshold was retained at 400 persons per square kilometre and the secondary density threshold was added. Employment density was added to the delineation. The employment density was calculated by taking the number of employees in a square kilometer and dividing it by the number of employees in the block

The rules for population centers are ranked in order of priority

  1. If a group of contiguous dissemination blocks have a population density of at least 400 persons per square kilometre for the current census, they are a population cluster
  2. If a block has a population density of 200 persons per km or an employment density of 400 employees per square km, it is added to the cluster
  3. To retain the population centre, the population cluster must have a minimum population of 1,000 and a population density of at least 400 persons per square kilometre
  4. The distance between the population centers is measured. If the distance is less than two kilometres, the population centers are combined to form a single center. There are certain restrictions when combining population centers less than two kilometres apart. If the population centre is not combined with another core, then it is only combined if they don’t cross the census metropolitan area or census agglomeration boundaries. The current block structure may prevent a population centre merger. If the population density of the newly formed population centre drops below 400, the blocks will not be added and the two nearby population centers will remain separated
  5. If the population density is not compromised by the addition ofDissemination Blocks that correspond to airport locations, the population centre will be added
  6. Interior holes are filled and there are no gaps

The population centres may be changed to ensure optimal boundaries

Rural areas

Rural areas include territory lying outside of population centers. Population centres and rural areas cover all of Canada

Rural population includes all population living in rural areas of census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, as well as population living outside of those areas

The structure and codes of the classification

The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification have two levels. The relationship is shown in Figure 1

  • Level 1 is the highest
  • Level 2 is the highest

The rural area and the centre size class categories are the first levels

The first level is made up of four categories: large urban population centres, medium urban population centres, small urban population centres and rural area

Level 2 includes population centers and rural areas

The names and codes of population centres that fall within their size class category are the second level. Population centres are identified using four-digit codes

The classification variant is different

In Statistics Canada, there are cases where the base classification does not meet the needs of the user and that’s when the variant is created. The Population Centre and Rural Area Classification 2016 is the classification version used for the classification variant. The base version of the variant is aggregated, regrouped or extended to provide alternatives to the standard structure

The Population Centre and Rural Area is a variant

The Population Centre and Rural Area 2016 is a variant of the Population Centre and Rural Area Classification. The classification variant has two levels in the hierarchy

  • The regions of Canada
  • There are provinces and territories

This allows for the classification of the population centre size class categories by province. The structure of the classification is shown in Figure 2

Figure 2 Variant: Population Centre and Rural Area by Province and Territory

  • Level 1 is the highest
  • Level 2 is the highest
  • Level 3 is the highest
  • Level 4 is the highest level

Level 1 is the geographical regions of Canada

The geographical regions of Canada are groupings of provinces. The six geographical regions of Canada are

  • The Atlantic
  • Quebec
  • Ontario
  • The Prairies
  • British Columbia
  • The Territories

Level 2 includes provinces and territories

The major political units of Canada are referred to asvince andterritory. The province and territory are basic areas for which data is collected. Canada has 10 provinces and 3 territories

Level 3 includes categories for population centre size and rural area

The four category names are large urban population centres, medium urban population centres, small urban population centres and rural area

The population centre size class category and rural area are included with the provincial or territorial part designation. The four categories under the province ofAlberta are:

  • Large urban population centers in Canada
  • Medium population centres in Canada
  • The population centres of the province ofAlberta
  • The area of rural Canada

Level 4 includes rural area and population centres

The names and codes of population centres that fall within their size class category are included in this level. The population centre code is followed by the two-digit province/territory code

There are five cases where the population centres cross provincial boundaries. The provincial parts are presented for each of the population centers. This is useful for analyzing the population centers that have provincial parts. The codes and names of the provincial parts of the population centers are listed

  • 13 Campbellton is in New York part
  • 24 Campbellton is in Quebec
  • 24 The part of Quebec that is called Hawkesbury
  • 35 0365 Hawkesbury is in Ontario
  • 24 The part of Canada that is called theatineau is in Quebec
  • The part of Ontario that is called the Ottawa–Gatineau part
  • Flin Flon is part of the Manitoba part
  • Flin Flon is part of the Sabah
  • Lloydminster is part of the Sabahwan part
  • Lloydminster is part of the province ofAlberta



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